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<  Parents and Family  ~  Human Breast Milk

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 4:00 am
User avatarContent WriterPosts: 1597Location: Melbourne, AUJoined: Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:31 amSchedule: Dual Core 1Start date: 01 Jan 2012Diet: Vegetarian KetogenicSchedule Stability: Mostly stable
Of course by now you will know I am interested in the science of natural physiology... I have been looking at mother's breast milk as a side interest from my study of mother/baby co-sleeping habits (strong links to polyphasic sleep).

I noticed a really interesting trend in the way we view what is natural human breast milk. From the website http://www.parentingscience.com/calorie ... -milk.html we see this quote:

Quote:
Zoologically speaking, there aren’t a lot of calories in breast milk. This is because human milk is relatively low in fat. It’s also low in protein.

Consider how humans stack up against these animals (values are given in percentage weight—all data from Jenness 1974).

• Human: 3.8% fat; 1% protein; 7% lactose

• Cow: 3.7% fat; 3.4% protein; 4.8% lactose

• Rat: 10.3% fat; 8.4% protein; 2.6% lactose

• Dog: 12.9% fat; 7.9% protein; 3.1% lactose

• Rabbit: 18.3% fat; 13.9% protein; 2.6% lactose


Notice how the human milk is most closely related to the cow. Now, at first I thought there was a link between the herbivorous diets and low fat breast milk, but then I thought this: Likely, the humans studied were on a high grain SAD diet, just as the cows studied were on a high grain diet too. It is in fact grain dominant diets (or, unnatural diets) that result in low fat breast milk! We look at the Rat, the Dog and the Rabbit (you can even look at the grass-fed Buffalo) milk and they are omnivorous, carniverous, herbivorous (and herbivorous again), but they all have breast milk fat% between 10-20%! And there is no noticeable correlation between them other than they always eat their natural diets. It could be that if we made another set of humans to test that were paleo/ optimal veg/ keto or partially keto, we would see very different breast milk fat %s!

I would theorize this... it only makes sense, right? We can't be the only creatures that have such naturally low fat breast milk.

Should we be looking at animal breast milk as a better indication for what we should be eating post-adolescence? If so, looking at an average of animals' milk ratio of 10f : 8p : 3c in grams we get a caloric ratio of 90f : 32p : 12c .

or, simplified, a caloric ratio of 67% fat, 24% protein, 9% carbs! That is 180 calories, or 45 grams of carbs a day in a 2000 calorie diet... and yes that is a ketogenic diet!



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 12:13 pm
User avatarContent WriterPosts: 1597Location: Melbourne, AUJoined: Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:31 amSchedule: Dual Core 1Start date: 01 Jan 2012Diet: Vegetarian KetogenicSchedule Stability: Mostly stable
To see if there was more proof supporting the idea that diet changes milk caloric ratios I looked into the matter deeper...

There is lots of literature showing that medications, vitamins and other chemicals make their way into the mother's breast milk, which is why mothers are advised not to drink alcohol while pregnant or breastfeeding.

From "Nutrition in pregnancy" Williamson CS (2006), we see that the mother's intake of omega 3 fats determines the o3 content of their milk. Omega 3s are a macronutrient and with increased intake by the mother, there is an increase of fat in the milk.

Basically your milk reflects what you eat. It is quite fortuitous in that if there is a deficiency it will draw out nutrients from the mother's body (such as DHA being drained from the mother's tissues), but if there is a great enough deficiency in the mother or mother's diet then the milk will eventually fall short.

According to Jensen RG. Lipids in Human Milk. Lipids 1999 we see that human's milk can be altered to express higher fat and lower carb through diet, when mothers are given a diet of 6-10 eggs a day and almost 10 ounces of chicken and pork for at least a month after the birth of her infant. Therefore a low carb mother eating lots of greens, fat and protein will have fatty milk, a high carb mother eating lots of whole grain and sugar is going to have a higher carb milk.



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PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 8:13 pm
User avatarContent WriterPosts: 1597Location: Melbourne, AUJoined: Sat Sep 08, 2012 7:31 amSchedule: Dual Core 1Start date: 01 Jan 2012Diet: Vegetarian KetogenicSchedule Stability: Mostly stable
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/89/6/ ... l.pdf+html

With regard to infants’ intake, the H-F diet induced a higher milk fat content (13%), a higher energy intake (7%), and a higher percentage of energy from fat (8%) than did the H-CHO diet.



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